• Biography

    Laurier is a current Library and Information Sciences graduate student at the Morgridge College of Education.  She is also a 2020 Spectrum Scholar with the American Library Association. Her current interests are in special collections, metadata, equity and diversity in archival methods and history.  Laurier currently works as a Metadata Curator for the Anderson Academic Common's Office of Teaching and Learning and an ECHO Coordinator with the Center for Rural School Health & Education (CRSHE). She is also a Thomas Intern with the University of Oregon Libraries and works with the library's Digital Strategies and Digital Scholarship Services division as a Digital Strategies Collections Specialist. The primary focus of this role is to assist the department in improving the library's open access digital repository, Scholars' Bank, to better support the teaching and research goals of the University of Oregon. For more information about Scholars' Bank, please visit https://scholarsbank.uoregon.edu/xmlui/.  Laurier also worked with Duke University Libraries' Digital Collections & Curation Services department as a practicum intern. Her primary responsibility was investigating best practices in metadata creation and archival description to better reflect diversity, equity, and inclusion in the university's digital collections. For more information on Duke University's repository, please visit https://repository.duke.edu/dc

    In her spare time, Laurier enjoys video editing, video games, hiking, traveling, and studying Medieval European history. 

    Laurier also has two loveable pups named Tyrion and Rhaegar. 

                   

  • Articles

  • Read the full article here.

  • Never Forget the High John Experiment

    Read the full article here.

  • Read the full article here.

  • Projects

  • Program Plan for ESL Spanish Speakers for Denver Public Libraries

    This program proposal was part of the curriculum for User Acces 4015 in the Fall of 2019.  

    The program plan for esl Spanish speakers at the Denver Public Library main branch’s mission is to increase patron satisfaction by improving upon current services and implementing new additions in technology, services and staffing.
    We propose the implantation of staff revisions and signage updates to better assist native Spanish speakers in navigating through the library. Updating the library’s catalog with more books and community pamphlets in Spanish will attract more Spanish speaking patrons. Providing free Spanish lessons for all ages will not only attract more Spanish speaking patrons but also provide a valued service for the community as a whole.

    Latinos or Hispanics make up 21% of Colorado’s total population, yet many businesses and organizations disregard the need for services in Spanish (United States Census Bureau). The influx of Latino immigrants to areas like Denver began during post World War II. The remnants of the war increased the United States’ demand for labor. From the 1950s to the 1990s, over 2.2 million Mexican immigrants arrived in the United States to meet the country’s economic demand for new labor (Bergad & Klein, 2010, p. 15). By the 1980s, the total Latino population numbered 14.8 million (Bergad & Klein, 2010 p. 15).


    These are just a couple examples to demonstrate the impact and contributions the Hispanic community has on the United States’ population and culture. Why then do our communities and businesses not support the Hispanic community linguistically and culturally? This lack of support has created linguistic and cultural isolation among the Latino and Hispanic populous. While implementing changes within our libraries is just a start, the library is the “beating heart” of our communities. It serves as a safe place for everyone to educate and express themselves. The library is where change should start.

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  • User Access 4015 Marketing Proposal for Juvenile Detention Center Library

    This marketing plan proposal was a group assignment for the implementation of a library within a fictious juvenile detention center.  The proposal focuses on not only the creation of a library but also programs within the library to assist in GED and high school diploma acquisition, reading and mathematics comprehension, career development, addiction counseling and college prep assistance.  The goal of the program is to assist in the decrease of recidivism within juvenile detention centers. 

     

    Creative Commons License
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

  • Easy Eats Community Outreach Page

    Want to lean how to cook easy affordable meals? Check out Easy Eats! Easy Eats was created as an outreach and engagement project by the LIS community to help faculty, staff and students learn how to make delicious easy to cook meals. Every week I will demonstrate a new recipe and teach you how to make easy dishes on a budget. Check it out at Easy Eats.

    If you have a special request or would like to submit a video/picture of your own creation of an Easy Eats dish, please feel free to contact me at Ieateasyeats@gmail.com

    Easy Eats Featured in Morgridge College of Education Dean's Letter

  • Laurier Hampton selected to participate in fireside chat with Black Lives Matter co-founder

     

     

  • Projects Continued

  • Foundations of Library, Archival, and Information Science 4000 Cookery and Foodways Special Collection Film

    The Anderson Academic Common's Cookery and Foodways Special Collection's game show is a film created by Morgridge College of Education students to advertise the University of Denver library's special collection of cookbooks.  These meals were hand selected and created by DU students for DU students, faculty and staff.  The film provides insight into what people ate in the past in different regions of the world.  

     

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    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

  • Bias in Subject Headings_LaurierHampton[552].pptx

  • Bias in Subject Headings Presentation | LIS 4010 Organization of Information | Winter 2020
  • Bias in Subject Headings Research | LIS 4010 Organization of Information | Winter 2020

    Abstract: This research paper analyzes the origins of subject headings and the biases imposed
    upon them by catalogers. LCSH is the most commonly used subject vocabulary throughout the
    world but it has a history of using obsolete, uninformed and offensive terminology. Many
    contemporary changes have been made over the years due to a growing outrage from librarians,
    spawning from the civil rights era. Librarian and activist Sanford Berman’s published work in
    1971, P&A, successfully petitioned the Library of Congress to change or delete a list of offensive
    terms related to social groups and rights. Although complaints on behalf of the library
    community led to several vocabulary changes in subject headings, LCSH still utilizes offensive
    and misleading vocabulary on topics regarding religion race. Instead of catalogers using terms
    associated with stereotyped behavior, social groups should be consulted on how they would like
    to be identified.

    Creative Commons License
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

  • Digital Libraries: Black Lives Matter Video Project | Fall 2020

    Visit the Black Lives Matter Video Project here.

    Creative Commons License
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

This portfolio last updated: 22-Oct-2021 1:32 PM