• Location of OLLI-On-Campus Courses

  • All OLLI-on-Campus classes will be held at the Katherine A Ruffatto Hall on the University of Denver campus, 2080 South High Street, Denver, CO 80208

    Members taking classes at Ruffatto Hall will be issued a parking access card for the garage with complete maps and instructions.

    Map to Ruffatto Hall

  • Winter 2019 Registration-On-Line November 19, 2018

  • Click on the button to register after you have selected your classes. First four week classes in Middle Column; 2nd four weeks in third column
    Click on the button to register after you have selected your classes.  First four week classes in Middle Column; 2nd four weeks in third column
  • Please watch this video to learn how to register for multiple sites

    Multiple Site Registration

  • Please watch this video to learn how to register for one site: Video is the same for OLLI on Campus as Central

    One Site Registration

  • Winter Term Catalog 2019

  • OLLI on Campus - Winter 2019 Catalog

  • Click the links below to access the Winter 2019 catalog of classes for Central or East .  To register by mail click on the link below; print form, fill out and return to the OLLI office per instructions in the form.

     

    OLLI Cental and OLLI East Catalogs are shown below

  • EAST Winter Catalog click here

  • Central Winter 2019 Click Here

  • OLLI-on-Campus Mail-in Registration Form

  • Weekly Class Overview for Winter 2019 Classes

  • Classes start Tuesday, January 15, 2019 and end Thursday, March 7, 2019

    Morning classes start at 9:30 and afternoon classes at 1:00, unless otherwise stated.

    All courses are four weeks.  Please note when your class will begin.

  • TUESDAY

    Looking at Israel Through Multiple Perspectives- 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.

    (January 15th - March 5th)

    Enjoying Shakespeare-Plays, Magic and Dreams-1:00 - 3:00 p.m.

    (January 15th - March 5th)

    Israeli Identities:  Exploring Unity and Tension - 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.

    (February 12th - March 5th)

    Enjoying Shakespeare-- "I am not what I am" - 1:00 - 3:00 p.m

    (February 12th - March 5th)

    Roots of Contemporary Russia - Cultural and Hostorical Perspectives on Putin's World Part II - 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.

    (February 12th - March 5th)

     

    WEDNESDAY

    Alienation as a Theme in Western Literature - 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.

    (January 16th   - February 6th)

    Wisdom Healing:  Qigong for Health & Happiness - 1:00 - 3:00 P.M.

    (January 16th - February 6th)

    Navigating Change:  How to Find Your Pizazz and Thrive Part  II- 9:30 - 11:30 A.M.

    (February 13th  - March 6th)

    Pioneering Abstract Expressionist Women - 9:30 - 11:30 a.m.

    (February 13th  - March 6th)

    Meditation in Motion:  The Art and Science of Tai Chi- 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.

     (February 13th  - March 6th)

    Paying it Forward: The Art of Mentoring -

    THURSDAY

    Buddhist Psychology:  Addressing the Challenges  &  Stresses in our Lives-9:30 - 11:30 a.m.

    (February 14th - March 7th)

  • Winter 2019 Detailed Course Description-First Four Weeks

  • First Four Weeks, beginning Tuesday January 15th

    (January 15th, 22nd, 29th, February 5th)

    Parking Passes Provided!

     

    Looking at Israel Through Multiple Perspectives

    Tuesday, January 15th (Four Weeks)

    Beginning Tuesday, January 15th - 9:30 – 11:30 am

     Israel- a 70-year-old country with 5,000 years of history, is a fascinating, complex, inspirational and challenging place. From modern society to ancient roots, from innovative technologies to challenges, from inspirational holiness to troubling conflicts and from diversity of society to unity- there are so many points of view.

    In this course we will explore several different perspectives into Modern Israel. These perspectives formulate a tool that will enable better understanding of Israel’s main issues and provide a deeper and wider point of view through which to analyze current events.

    Books/Materials: None

     Class Format: Each class will focus on a few perspectives into Israel. These will be presented by the lecturer through a presentation with short videos, to be followed by a group discussion about the issues covered. Special attention will be given to discuss relevant stories from current news to be analyzed through these perspectives.

    Course Fee:  $20 for OLLI Members

     Class Location: University of Denver, Katherine A Ruffatto Hall, Room 306

    Instructor: Osnat Fox is an Israeli in Colorado for a 3-year term as JEWISH Colorado’s Israel Emissary (“Shlichah”), a cultural, non-governmental position. Osnat works to educate, connect people to people and advocate for Israel. She has a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in education policy and management. Osnat welcomes honest and complex discussions as the best way towards learning, understanding and connecting.

    Enjoying Shakespeare – Plays, magic and dreams: “We are the stuff that dreams are made on.”

    Tuesday, January 15th (Four Weeks)

    Beginning Tuesday, January 15th – 1:00 – 3:00 pm

    Course Description:  We’ll read and watch three of Shakespeare’s plays – Richard III, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and The Tempest, using the above theatrical devices as a starting point, but also discussing Shakespeare’s concepts of history, tragedy, comedy and romance. Lots of his favorite themes will also present themselves for our discussions. I will provide some historical and biographical background material and a list of filmed versions of the plays. Students may read and bring to class any copy of the plays (with explanatory notes) most convenient for them. I like the Barnes and Noble and Folger Library editions.

    Books/Materials: Three of Shakespeare’s plays – Richard III, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and The Tempest

    Class Format: Instructor presentation, film, and discussion

    Course Fee:  $20 for OLLI Members

     Class Location: University of Denver, Katherine A Ruffatto Hall, Room 409

    Instructor: Lucy Graca was a professor of English and humanities at Arapahoe Community College for 23 years, teaching many literature courses, including “Introduction to Shakespeare.” She holds a Masters’ degree in English Language and Literature from the University of Massachusetts, with concentrations in Shakespeare and rhetoric. Retired now, she has been spending most of her time in writing for a local newspaper, photography and walking.

    Roots of Contemporary Russia: Cultural and Historical Perspectives on Putin's World - Part 1

    Tuesday, January 15th (Four Weeks)

    Beginning Tuesday, January 15th – 1:00 – 3:00 pm

    Russia cannot be understood by reason alone.

    Common measures cannot be applied to her.

    She has a special character.

    One must simply believe in Russia.Tiutchev, 1866.

     

    I cannot forecast to you the action of Russia.

    It is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma;

    but perhaps there is a key. That key is Russian national interest.

    Winston Churchill, 1939

    The foundation of today’s Russia is traditionally dated back to its Christianization in 988, which was more than the adoption of a faith, but the emergence of an internationally recognized state based in Kiev (today’s Ukraine!) with foundational connections to Scandinavia and Byzantium. Over the past millennium, this state as expanded, developed, and shifted, morphing into the medieval Grand Duchy of Moscow and reaching global status in the Russian Empire of the Czars and the Soviet Empire of the Commissars. The question now is: Whither Putin’s Russia? We will look to Russia’s past for overarching themes embedded in its history and culture which play an essential role in defining today’s Russia and its future.

    • Foundations in Medieval Russia: Kiev and Moscow
    • The Russian Empire: Expansion and colonization
    • Soviet Union: An ideology-driven experiment
    • Russia and the West: The question that never goes away
    • Russia at war
    • Russian intelligentsia and nobility
    • Traditions of protest and terrorism

    Books/Materials: None. Internet access will greatly facilitate communication and sharing materials during the course.

     Class Format: Presentation and Discussion

    Course Fee:  $20 for OLLI Members

    Class Location: University of Denver, Katherine A Ruffatto Hall, Room 122

     

    Instructor: Gil Rappaport, Ph.D. (email: grappster@gmail.com) is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. He retired in 2014

    after a 35-year career at that institution. He taught numerous advanced undergraduate courses surveying Russian (and Polish) culture in their historical development, as well as graduate courses in

    Slavic linguistics. He is an amateur pianist and lover of music of (almost!) all kinds. This is his second course for OLLI-on-campus, having taught Exploring Russian Music: Your key to Unlocking

    Russian History and Culture in the Spring 2018 term.

     

    Navigating Change: How to Find Your Pizazz and Thrive! - Part 1

     Wednesday, January 16th (Four Weeks)

    Beginning Wednesday, January 16th - 9:30 – 11:30 am

     Our mature years present an opportunity for spiritual, emotional, and psychological integration. In this 8-week class you’ll learn the skills needed to confidently grow and build a life of meaning and purpose in a supportive community. You’ll discover how to make life-changing decisions to bring greater freedom, self-expression and peace of mind. Relying on research from the fields of gerontology, education, psychology and neuroscience, the course will take you on a step-by-step journey of change—clearing out the old to make way for the new. We will uncover and examine what’s possible in areas important to us and learn to see life as an ongoing opportunity!

    Session #1 – The Surprises of Aging

    Session #2 – Adapting to Change through Play and Connection

    Session #3 – True to Ourselves or Set in Our Ways

    Session #4 – Grief and Self-Compassion

    Books/Materials Fees:  $35.00 charge for book – to be collected at class. This book is used in both Part I and Part II.

     Class Format: Instructor presentation, group discussion, and small group exercises.

     Course Fee:  $20 for OLLI Members

     Class Location: University of Denver, Katherine A Ruffatto Hall, Room 435

    Instructor: Catherine Dockery, MA, is a trained conscious aging facilitator and life coach and started the Center for Conscious Aging. She is passionate about encouraging and motivating older adults to embrace and engage in a new version of them as they mature. She conducts workshops, presentations, and trainings. She consults on topics such as developmental stages of aging, de-cluttering and downsizing, conscious aging, mindfulness, self-compassion, grief and forgiveness, and life-review. Catherine is an alumnus of the University of Colorado at Denver. In her earlier career, she developed public policy at both the state and local levels of government for over 25 years

    Susan Ludwig LCSQ , worked in the public sector in family services policy for many years.  She is currently the Colorado co-coordinator for Citizen's Climate Lobbyis a trained conscious aging facilitator and life coach and started the Center for Conscious Aging.

     

    Alienation as a Theme in Western Literature

    Wednesday, January 16th (Four Weeks)

    Beginning Wednesday, January 16th - 9:30 – 11:30 am

     The actions of alienated individuals have been much in the news recently.  But “alienation” is nothing new; it has been a theme in Western Literature for at least two centuries. Many of the best writers have dealt with the subject of the isolated misfit who blames (rightly or wrongly) his society or social milieu for his inability to become a member of his group.  

    In this course, we will follow the experiences of some literary protagonists and attempt to explain the reason for their alienated state. We will look at Dostoevsky’s NOTES FROM UNDERGROUND, Camus’s L’ETRANGER (“THE OUTSIDER”), and three short stories: “Easter Night” by Anton Chekhov, “On Greenhow Hill” by Rudyard Kipling, and (time permitting) “Soroche” by Andrea Barrett.  I hope to provide contextual, historical and critical background to the reading.

    I would emphasize that this is primarily a literature course, and the works we read will be studied as literary artifacts rather than as social documents. And while we will be aware of the current relevance of the theme underlying these works, we will be reading primarily for pleasure, as these selections are chosen in large part for their entertainment value!  Nonetheless, we will attempt to compile a list of the characteristics which alienated individuals, real and fictional, have in common.

    Books/Materials:  NOTES FROM UNDERGROUND by Feodor Dostoevsky, L’ETRANGER (THE STRANGER) by Albert Camus, “Easter Night” by Anton Chekhov, “On Greenhow Hill” by Rudyard Kipling, and (time permitting) “Soroche” by Anrea Barrett.  Both novels are available in inexpensive editions. NOTES FROM UNDERGROUND is available in a Dover Thrift Edition; THE STRANGER is available in a Vintage International Edition (a new translation) I recommend both of these editions. Copies of the short stories will be distributed to each member of the class. 

     Class Format: Lecture and discussion

     Course Fee:  $20 for OLLI Members

     Class Location: University of Denver, Katherine A Ruffatto Hall, Room 206

    Instructor Roderick (Rod) Webb, University of Leads, Yorkshire England, is a Denver native, and has a degree in history and literature from Yale University, and a J.D. also from Yale. Upon graduation, Rod became a Lecturer in Common Law Subjects at the University of Leeds in Yorkshire England. His 30 years in Europe gave him ample scope to indulge his interests in literature and history, as well as to travel to many archaeological sites in the Mediterranean and the Middle East. From1970-1972, he was a Visiting Lecturer in Law at the University of Malawi in East Africa.  His many years as a counsellor allowed him to meet and, he hopes, help several alienated students. He has also been the official moderator of several literary discussion groups.

    Wisdom Healing: Qigong for Health & Happiness

    Wednesday, January 16th (Four Weeks)

    Beginning Wednesday, January 16th – 1:00 – 3:00 pm

    Qigong (alternatively spelled chi gung or chi kung) is a form of gentle exercise composed of movements that are repeated a number of times, often stretching the body, increasing fluid movement (blood, synovial and lymph) and building awareness of how the body moves through space. 

    When you practice and learn a qigong exercise movement, there are both external movements and internal movements. These internal movements or flows in China are called neigong or "internal power". These internal neigong movements make qigong a superior health and wellness practice.

    Books/Materials: None

    Class Format: Lecture and Movement

    Course Fee:  $20 for OLLI Members

     Class Location: University of Denver, Katherine A Ruffatto Hall, Room 435

    Instructors: Coleene Frances studied Qigong with Master Mingtong Gu and other masters in China and the U.S. for the past ten years.   She is a certified WH Qigong teacher offering classes locally and at the Chi Center in Santa Fe, New Mexico (chicenter.com).  She received her M.A. in Spiritual Psychology from the University of Santa Monica, California.

    Susan Ludwig, LCSW, worked in the public sector in family services policy for many years. She managed numerous child welfare projects and later established a training program for family meeting facilitators, conducted court mediations and taught child welfare policy as an adjunct professor at the University of Denver Graduate School of Social Work. Six years ago Susan became a member and then the Colorado co-coordinator for Citizens' Climate Lobby, an advocacy organization focused on Congressional climate change action. She teaches workshops on how to build your legacy by engaging with curiosity and compassion in social issues.

     

  • Winter 2019 Detailed Course Description-2nd Four Weeks

  • 2nd Four Weeks, beginning Tuesday February 12th

    (February 12th, 19th, 26th, March 5th)

    Parking Passes Provided!

     

    Israeli Identities: Exploring Unity and Tension

    Tuesday, February 12th (Four Weeks)

    Beginning Tuesday, February 12th - 9:30 – 11:30 am

    Israel is many things to many peoples. It is a homeland, a divine holy land, a shelter from persecution, an ancestral home and so much more. Looking through the eyes of the people who call Israel home allows a fascinating insider view into this intriguing and multi-faceted country.

    In this course we will look at the people of Israel, their stories and the way these stories shape the way they look at Israel. We will explore the complexity within Israel’s Jewish majority as well as look into the country’s minority populations and try to undertake understanding the melting pot that Israel is- from Orthodox to secular Jews, farmers to high tech, a diversity of Jewish cultures from all corners of the world and diversity of ethnic identities and religious.

    All these intersecting identities and life stories will be explored using concepts of unity and tension and will be used to explain some of Israel main social aspect and modern challenges.

    Books/Materials: None

    Class Format: Each class will focus on a few perspectives into Israel. These will be presented by the lecturer through a presentation with short videos, to be followed by a group discussion about the issues covered. Special attention will be given to discuss relevant stories from current news to be analyzed through these perspectives.

    Course Fee:  $20 for OLLI Members

    Class Location: University of Denver, Katherine A Ruffatto Hall, Room 306

    Instructor: Osnat Fox is an Israeli in Colorado for a 3-year term as JEWISH Colorado’s Israel Emissary (“Shlichah”), a cultural, non-governmental position. Osnat works to educate, connect people to people and advocate for Israel. She has a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in education policy and management. Osnat welcomes honest and complex discussions as the best way towards learning, understanding and connecting.

     

    Enjoying Shakespeare – “I am not what I am.”

    Tuesday, February 12th (Four Weeks)

    Beginning Tuesday, February 12th – 1:00 – 3:00 pm

    We’ll read and watch three plays in which this favorite theme of Shakespeare’s is important: Henry IV part I, Othello, and Twelfth Night but also discuss his concepts of history, tragedy and comedy. Lots of Shakespeare’s other favorite themes will also present themselves for our discussions. I will provide some historical and biographical background material and a list of filmed versions of the plays. Students may read and bring to class any copy of the plays (with explanatory notes) most convenient for them. I like the Barnes and Noble and Folger Library editions.

    Books/Materials: Three of Shakespeare’s plays - Henry IV part I, Othello, and Twelfth Night

    Class Format: Instructor presentation, film, and discussion

    Course Fee:  $20 for OLLI Members

    Class Location: University of Denver, Katherine A Ruffatto Hall, Room 409

    Instructor: Lucy Graca was a professor of English and humanities at Arapahoe Community College for 23 years, teaching many literature courses, including “Introduction to Shakespeare.” She holds a Masters’ degree in English Language and Literature from the University of Massachusetts, with concentrations in Shakespeare and rhetoric. Retired now, she has been spending most of her time in writing for a local newspaper, photography and walking.

    Roots of Contemporary Russia: Cultural and Historical Perspectives on Putin's World - Part II

    Tuesday, February 12th (Four Weeks)

    Beginning Tuesday, February 12th – 1:00 – 3:00 pm

     Russia cannot be understood by reason alone.

    Common measures cannot be applied to her.

    She has a special character.

    One must simply believe in Russia.Tiutchev, 1866.

     

    I cannot forecast to you the action of Russia.

    It is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma;

    but perhaps there is a key. That key is Russian national interest.

    Winston Churchill, 1939

     

    The foundation of today’s Russia is traditionally dated back to its Christianization in 988, which was more than the adoption of a faith, but the emergence of an internationally recognized state based in Kiev (today’s Ukraine!) with foundational connections to Scandinavia and Byzantium. Over the past millennium, this state as expanded, developed, and shifted, morphing into the medieval Grand Duchy of

    Moscow and reaching global status in the Russian Empire of the Czars and the Soviet Empire of the Commissars. The question now is: Whither Putin’s Russia? We will look to Russia’s past for overarching

    themes embedded in its history and culture which play an essential role in defining today’s Russia and its future.

    • Russian art
    • Russian music
    • Russian literature: poetry of the Silver Age
    • Russian film
    • Petersburg: Virtual tour
    • Moscow: Virtual tour

    Books/Materials: None. Internet access will greatly facilitate communication and sharing materials during the course.

    Class Format: Presentation and Discussion

    Course Fee:  $20 for OLLI Members

    Class Location: University of Denver, Katherine A Ruffatto Hall, Room 122

    Instructor: Gil Rappaport, Ph.D. (email: grappster@gmail.com) is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. He retired in 2014 after a 35-year career at that institution. He taught numerous advanced undergraduate courses surveying Russian (and Polish) culture in their historical development, as well as graduate courses in Slavic linguistics. He is an amateur pianist and lover of music of (almost!) all kinds. This is his second course for OLLI-on-campus, having taught Exploring Russian Music: Your key to Unlocking Russian History and Culture in the Spring 2018 term.

     

    Navigating Change: How to Find Your Pizazz and Thrive! - Part II

    Wednesday, February 13th (Four Weeks)

    Beginning Wednesday, February 13th - 9:30 – 11:30 am

    Our mature years present an opportunity for spiritual, emotional, and psychological integration. In this 8-week class you’ll learn the skills needed to confidently grow and build a life of meaning and purpose in a supportive community. You’ll discover how to make life-changing decisions to bring greater freedom, self-expression and peace of mind. Relying on research from the fields of gerontology, education, psychology and neuroscience, the course will take you on a step-by-step journey of change—clearing out the old to make way for the new. We will uncover and examine what’s possible in areas important to us and learn to see life as an ongoing opportunity!

    Session #5 – Letting Go of Perfection

    Session #6 – Impermanence: Everything is Temporary

    Session #7 – Rethinking the Possibilities

    Session #8 – A New Vision

    Books/Materials Fees:  $35.00 charge for book – to be collected at class. This book is used in both Part I and Part II. 

    Class Format: Instructor presentation, group discussion, and small group exercises.

    Course Fee:  $20 for OLLI Members

    Class Location: University of Denver, Katherine A Ruffatto Hall,  Room 401

    Instructor: Catherine Dockery, MA, is a trained conscious aging facilitator and life coach and started the Center for Conscious Aging. She is passionate about encouraging and motivating older adults to embrace and engage in a new version of them as they mature. She conducts workshops, presentations, and trainings. She consults on topics such as developmental stages of aging, de-cluttering and downsizing, conscious aging, mindfulness, self-compassion, grief and forgiveness, and life-review. Catherine is an alumnus of the University of Colorado at Denver. In her earlier career, she developed public policy at both the state and local levels of government for over 25 years.

    Susan Ludwig LCSQ , worked in the public sector in family services policy for many years.  She is currently the Colorado co-coordinator for Citizen's Climate Lobby

     

    Pioneering Abstract Expressionist Women

    Wednesday, February 13th (Four Weeks)

    Beginning Wednesday, February 13th - 9:30 – 11:30 am

    In the storied annals of Abstract Expressionism, the narrative usually proceeds by way of Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, and a host of other male artists, each held up as an example of heroic, romantic genius artists. These men, the story goes, changed American art and the art world forever. A new book by Mary Gabriel, Ninth Street Women, deflates the mythic storytelling and instead charts the course of Abstract Expressionism by examining five female artists and their pioneering contributions to the mid-century American art movement.

    This course will provide an overview of this consequential mid-twentieth-century American art movement using Gabriel’s book as our guide. One of the abiding paradoxes of Abstract Expressionism is the artists’ simultaneous insistence on fierce individuality and the cultivation of a close-knit community. We will trace the roots of the artists from the 1930s along their various roads to artistic maturity in the 1950s. We will consider the political implications of their artistic processes and the ideas with which they engaged as well as issues of gender.

    Books/Materials: Mary Gabriel, Ninth Street Women: Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Helen Frankenthaler (Little, Brown and Co., 2018)

    Class Format: Lecture with ample class discussion.

    Course Fee:  $20 for OLLI Members

     Class Location: University of Denver, Katherine A Ruffatto Hall, Room 435

    Instructor:  Valerie Hellstein has a Ph.D. in art history and taught for several years in various colleges and universities in the north east. She is currently writing a book on Abstract Expressionism, Collectivity, and the Cold War. Valerie, a popular facilitator, has taught 4 courses for OLLI-on- Campus.

    Meditation in Motion: The Art and Science of Tai Chi

    Wednesday, February 13th (Four Weeks)

    Beginning Wednesday, February 13th – 1:00 – 3:00 pm 

    Experience for yourself the accumulated wisdom of centuries with the timeless exercise of T’ai Chi. According to the Harvard Medical Health Publication “Tai chi is often described as meditation in motion, but it might well be called medication in motion”. Designed to be a hands-on learning experience, this class will explore the principles and basic exercises in T’ai chi and the growing body of evidence of its value in treating or preventing many health problems. This introduction to T’ai Chi Ch’uan is both practical and participative, the course introduces you to the basics of T’ai Chi Ch’uan, the skills and principles involved. These exercises can be a powerful complement to medical intervention. Modern studies have reported positive effects of Tai Chi on balance and falls reduction, hypertension, diabetes, arthritis, osteoporosis, cancer, COPD, heart disease, depression and even schizophrenia. Many more studies are underway to explore the medical benefits of this mind/body exercise. Topics for discussion will include the global health care implications of Tai Chi as well as applications in daily life.

    ooks/Materials: The Harvard Medical School Guide to Tai Chi: 12 Weeks to a Healthy Body, Strong Heart, and Sharp Mind, Author, Peter Wayne, Publisher, Shambhala Publications, 2013 New and used books available through Amazon.com, and the Tattered Cover book store

    Class Format: Lecture and Movement

    Course Fee:  $20 for OLLI Members

    Class Location: University of Denver, Katherine A Ruffatto Hall, Room 401

    Instructor: Joseph Brady MSTCM, L. Ac. Dipl. O.M. is a nationally board-certified practitioner of Oriental Medicine. Joe taught on healthy aging issues and coordinated the Gerontology program at the University of Denver for twenty years, also teaching classes in Tai Chi, Qigong and Traditional Chinese Medicine at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Metropolitan State College of Denver and currently teaches Tai Chi and Qigong at the Colorado School of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Joe wrote many articles on healthy aging for the Rocky Mountain News and has presented at many scientific conferences and has lectured and presented research at Harvard Medical School’s Osher Institute for Integrative Medicine and at the Oxford Union Debating Hall and Harris Manchester College, Oxford University U.K.

     

     

     

    Wednesday, February 13th (Four Weeks)

    Beginning Wednesday, February13th – 1:00 – 3:00 pm

     

    Paying It Forward: The Art of Mentoring

    Calling all scientists, doctors, teachers, engineers, artists, musicians, and anyone else whose career involved Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, or Mathematics. Have you ever thought of using your experience and talents to help the next generation? This 4-week course will teach you all you need to know about the art of mentoring: from finding and choosing a protégé, to forging a relationship, to collaborating with other mentors. Mentors serve four roles: teacher, advisor, coach and feedback provider. We will look at each of these as well as discover your hidden talents which can be shared with others.

    Opportunities to mentor (both in-person and virtually) in STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) will be offered to course participants through a new program in New Mexico entitled “STEAMing Ahead for Success.” This program focuses on providing teachers and middle and high-school students with opportunities to learn how STEAM is both part of our daily lives AND how to prepare for careers in these fields. Our course in Winter Session is Part One of the Art of Mentoring. Part 2 will be offered in the spring and will focus on continued support of a mentoring relationship.

    Books/Materials: None

    Class Format: Presentation and Discussion

    Course Fee:  $20 for OLLI Members

    Class Location: University of Denver, Katherine A Ruffatto Hall, Room 206

    Instructor Jacqueline Kearns Wyant has extensive experience in program development and implementation. She has designed comprehensive state-wide programs and facilitated trainings for groups ranging from 12 to over 1200 participants. Areas of expertise include leadership development, mentoring, and systems improvement. Ms. Wyant is a successful grant writer of both large and small-scale projects ranging from $5,000 to $5 million. Most recently she was a project developer and program manager for a $5 million, 3-year grant with the New Mexico Public Education Department for state-wide professional development for all educators. She has worked as a Principal Consultant for McREL International located in Denver where she managed a $1.5 million grant to publish eight research documents on successful programs and policies in supporting underserved students of poverty and color.

    Co-Instructor Dr. Joanne Ihrig,

     

    Buddhist Psychology:  Addressing the Challenges & Stresses in our Lives

    Thursday, February 14th (Four Weeks)

    Beginning Thursday, February 14th - 9:30 – 11:30 am

    Buddhism, a 2500-year-old spiritual path, continues to be relevant to this world’s challenges as evidenced by it being one of the growing spiritual traditions within this and other Western countries.  Mindfulness, a meditation practice grounded in Buddhism, has almost become a household word.  This class will present some of the basic tenets of Buddhism such as the nature of mind, the freedom arising from non-attachment, the basic five emotions, and the Four Immeasurables.  We will explore how they apply to or can inform our everyday challenges and stresses.

    We will sample various meditation forms such as mindfulness, compassion and mantra. 

    Books/Materials: None

    Class Format: Presentation, Discussion and Meditation

    Course Fee:  $20 for OLLI Members

    Class Location: University of Denver, Katherine A Ruffatto Hall, Room 306

     Instructor: Gretchen Ann Groth, Ph.D., has been a Tibetan Buddhist practitioner with the Nyingma School for many years.  Several years ago, her teacher, Dungse Shenphen Dawa Rinpoche, appointed her as a Lama, Lama Pema Choki.  She has been a central member and meditation teacher with Yeshe Nyingpo Denver.   In other pursuits, she has been a national Organization Development and Diversity consultant.  Currently she teaches psychology at Metropolitan State University of Denver and pursues fiber/fabric arts.

     

This portfolio last updated: 13-Jan-2019 8:33 AM