• Schedule Your Research Interview

  • Were you born in China between 1979 and 2001?

    Are you currently 18 years or older?
    Are you interested in sharing your experiences about growing up?
    Participants can choose to have their interviews conducted in Chinese, English, or a mixture of both.
    Research interviews are open to men and women, urban and rural residents.
    We want to hear your story!

    *Interviews are currently being scheduled for:

    Monday, June 17:  3:00 pm, 4:00 pm

    Tuesday, June 18: 4:00 pm, 5:00 pm, 6:00 pm

    Wednesday, June 19: 4:00 pm, 5:00 pm, 6:00 pm

    Friday, June 21: 10:00 am, 11:00 am, 12:00 pm, 1:00 pm, 2:00 pm, 3:00 pm

    Click Here to Sign in to Pioneer Web to Schedule your Interview Appointment

    *INTERVIEW LOCATION:

    Sturm Hall, ROOM 200, Offices of the Department of Communication Studies

    (2nd Floor, Northeast Corner of the Building)

  • Research Flyer

  • Meet the Research Team

  • Beth Suter, Principal Investigator
    Beth Suter, Principal Investigator

    Elizabeth (Beth) Suter is an Associate Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Denver specializing in critical interpersonal and family communication. Her research lies at the intersection of relationships and culture, addressing issues of power, struggle, and social change. Beth co-edited the special issue of the Journal of Family Communication on critical approaches to family communication research, and is a co-editor of the second edition of Engaging Theories in Family Communication, a comprehensive textbook on the key theories in family communication. As an adoptive mother of a child from China, Beth personally and professionally conceived this research project. Beth enjoys spending time with her family exploring the great outdoors. Her hobbies include walking, reading, baking, and expanding her yoga and pilates practice.

  • Kelsea Schoenbauer
    Kelsea Schoenbauer

    Kelsea V. Schoenbauer is a third-year PhD student interested in researching meaning making in the experience of relational-, historical-, and health-related suffering and healing. Born in North Dakota, raised in Minnesota and Iowa, Kelsea earned her BA from Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota and MA from the University of Wisconsin, and although clearly wielding a strong Midwestern pedigree, loves Colorado and Rocky Mountain living. She is an outdoors enthusiast and proud dog mom to two vizslas, Tuck and Nellie. Along with her husband Joe and their four-legged kids, Kelsea likes to hike, camp, and kayak in her free time. She is also a visual artist, an avid runner, and aspiring yoga instructor. Kelsea came to this project interested in exploring how China’s One-Child Policy and resulting One-Child Generation as historical processes and contexts become embodied and culturally inscribed as storied performances and how China’s One-Child Generation members make meaning of their experiences.

  • Xinyi Liu
    Xinyi Liu

    Xinyi Liu is a second-year MA student studying Communication and Accountancy at the University of Denver. Originally from Changsha, the capital of Hunan province in south-central China, Xinyi is a member of China's One-Child Generation currently studying abroad in the United States. Xinyi earned her BA from the University of Minnesota and despite the cold and snow decided to venture to the Rocky Mountain State. Along with her cat, Xinyi enjoys watching Pixar and Disney animated films and reading the Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings series. Her hobbies include finding new restaurants to try and engaging in various outdoor activities. A lover of nature, Xinyi recently traveled to various national parks across the country with her mom and looks forward to traveling abroad after graduation.

  • Liyang Hou
    Liyang Hou

    Liyang Hou lives and works in Beijing as a journalist. A recent graduate from the University of Denver, Liyang earned her MA in Communication Studies with an emphasis in Family and Interpersonal Communication. Liyang is a member of China’s One-Child Generation. In the long-held debate between rice or noodles, Liyang always sides with rice having been raised in China’s countryside.

  • Questions?

  • Email:

    OneChildChinaStudy@gmail.com

    elizabeth.suter@du.edu

     

     

     

     

  • Research Team Outtakes

This portfolio last updated: 04-Sep-2019 2:23 PM