• From PhD to Career

  • Career Pathways for JDP Students

    Check out the video of the Career Pathways Workshop.  

    Are you questioning if the professorial career path is right for you? Do you think you should explore other options but don't know where to start? The Career Pathways for JDP Students Workshop is designed for you. The workshop outlines the career decision making process and provides specific resources and ideas for exploring alternatives to faculty careers.

    The slide deck for the workshop is also available. 

    Career Pathways Workshop Slides.pptx

  • Career Options

    Use this link to a Prezi Presentation on Career Option resources within the JDP. Click each circle to zoom in to a new level. You will find course recommendations, internships, mentors, websites, and other resources to help you explore career options. Last updated 12-17-2019.

    From PhD to Career

  • Find Internships

    2U internships

  • Iliff Professional (In)formation Network (PIFN)

    See various job, internship, and volunteer opportunities here.

  • SKILL BUILDING

    People with a PhD can be attractive to industry and other places outside of academia.  DU offers one day classes that can build skills that are attractive to a wide variety of employers.

    https://daniels.du.edu/entrepreneurship/grinds/

  • Networking Opportunities

    Fellowship for Protestant Ethics (FPE)

    Fellowship for Protestant Ethics is opening membership for early-career scholars who are critically appreciative of the Protestant tradition(s) of ethical reflection and radically committed to the church's social witness. To be eligible for membership, applicants must be between qualifying examinations (having finished comprehensive/qualifying exams by the time of the meeting) and tenure, and be willing to participate in the annual symposium. Click here for more details.

  • Tips on Building/Maintaining a Job Search Network

    1. Make a list of everyone you know-and people they know-and identify how they could help you gather career information or experience. Who do you know at school? Professors, friends, and even friends' parents can all be helpful contacts. Did you hold a part-time job? Volunteer? Serve an internship? Think about the people you came into contact with there.

    2. Volunteer at a local museum, theater, homeless shelter-anywhere that even remotely relates to your field of study. By volunteering, you'll not only learn about your chosen field firsthand, you'll also be able to connect with people who are in the field.

    3. Schedule informational interviews with people who can tell you about their careers. It's best to ask to meet in person or by phone for a short interview, and don't immediately start asking "How can you help me?" Plan your questions ahead of time, focusing on how the company works and how the person shaped his or her career path.

    4. Add your profile to LinkedIn. It's free! And then, work your profile. Add your work history (including internships), skills, and keywords. Make connections with people you've worked with or met through networking. Ask for "recommendations" from people who have worked with you. You'll find that LinkedIn is a good source of contacts in your field, to whom you can reach out and set up informational interviews.

    5. Remember to be courteous and tactful in all your conversations, to send thank-you notes to people who help you and to find ways to help others as well. Don't drop your network once you've secured a job. Nurture the relationships you built and look for opportunities to build new connections throughout your career.

This portfolio last updated: 21-Jan-2022 12:18 PM