• Posters - 2021 GEPSC: Addressing Disproportionality in Gifted Education

  • Accepted Posters

    This table lists authors, Twitter handles, and links to .pdfs of Posters. Abstracts are further below. 

    Arnstein, K.

    @karenarnstein

    Lessons Learned Teaching Preadolescent Twice-Exceptional Students

    Boley, V.

    @Vicki_Boley

    Addressing The Underrepresentation of Minority Students in Gifted Programing Through General Education Teacher Professional Development: What Does The Literature Say?

    Brave, K. 

    @lavinbrave

    Income, Race, and Achievement Over Time: Comparing the Growth of Academically Advanced Students Using ECLS-K 1998-2007 Data

    Cameron, T.

     

    Gifted Black Girls: Factors that Influence Engagement, Achievement, & Representation in STEM Education

    Coggin, K.

     

    Does Language Ability Equal Giftedness?

    Dillard, S.

    @scdenrichment

    Elevated in Mind | Rooted in Culture: How Integrating Cultural Inclusivity and a Holistic Enrichment Program Increases GT Enrollment

    Hertzog, N. et al.

    @nhertzog

    @jlamon32

    Dismantling White Spaces in Gifted Education

    Pendleton, S. and

    @msstacey303

    Ewing, V.

    @vanessa88946640

    You Don't Have to be Well-Behaved to be Gifted

    I-REECCH

    Reinert, L. et al.

    @lindsey_reinert

    @briaannaagraace

    @joilinco

    Initial Descriptions, Understanding, and Design of I-REECCH

    Reinert, L. and

    @lindsey_reinert

    Schmidt, K.

    Candid Conversations about Access and Equitable Practices for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners in Gifted Education

    Tackett, S. and

    @stackett_AK

    Torres, K. M.

    @kelly_tcspp

    Identifying Gifted Students: How can we better prepare teachers to address the underrepresentation of minority students?

    GTLCA

    @GTleadofcolorna

    Wilson, C. et al.

    @vanessa88946640

    @scdenrichment

    Building Bridges for Diverse Leaders: Reflections from a Year in Gifted & Talented Leaders of Color and Allies- GTLCA

  • Lessons Learned Teaching Preadolescent Twice-Exceptional Students

    Karen Arnstein, EdD

    Adjunct Professor, University of Redlands

    @karenarnstein

     

    This presentation reflects a portion of the findings from a collective case study that examined the perceived developmental transitions of preadolescent twice-exceptional (2e) students. This presentation is focused on Research Question (2) How do educators perceive growth in both academic and psychosocial development? The twice-exceptional student is characterized by extreme asynchrony and patterns of uneven development making identification difficult. Literature is scarce regarding scaffolding to support 2e students, yet dual differentiation is critical for success. Two semistructured interviews were conducted with each teacher to gather data reflecting upon their experiences teaching twice-exceptional students. Data was documented and interpreted using Erikson’s (1968) theory of psychosocial development. Three themes emerged when teachers were provided support for reflexive practice.

     

    Keywords: Twice-exceptional, differentiation, scaffolding, social and emotional, asynchrony

  • Addressing The Underrepresentation of Minority Students in Gifted Programing Through General Education Teacher Professional Development: What Does The Literature Say?

    Vicki Boley, MA

    EdD Student, University of Denver

    @Vicki_Boley

     

    Researchers who argue that disproportionality continues to exist in gifted programing cite the fact that minority students are still significantly underrepresented within gifted programs (Morgan et al, 2015 as cited in Ecket-Lyster & Niileksela, 2017; Skiba et al., 2008 as cited in Ecket-Lyster & Niileksela, 2017). Many reports contend that policies and procedures have a disparate impact on the identification, and thus the participation, of minority students in gifted programs, especially in light of one of the most common procedures used by schools: teacher referral (Ecket-Lyster & Niileksela, 2017; Naglieri & Ford, 2003). Research suggests that general education teachers often under-refer diverse students for gifted education screening and placement (Ecket-Lyster & Niileksela, 2017; Naglieri & Ford, 2003). The research also suggests that a) general education teachers in particular may rely exclusively on characteristics of gifted students that appear on published checklists without realizing that all gifted children do not necessarily meet such checklist descriptors and/or criteria; b) maintain negative attitudes and/or mistaken beliefs pertaining to gifted students and gifted education; c) operate under a deficit-model approach, in which training and/or professional development has conditioned them to focus on struggling learners and achievement gaps, leaving little-to-no foundation on how to best identify and support high-ability learners (Ecket-Lyster & Niileksela, 2017; Eckert & Robins, 2017; Lassig, 2009; Naglieri & Ford, 2003; Speirs-Neumeister et al., 2007). This literature review examines this issue of the underrepresentation of gifted minority students as it relates to disproportionality in gifted programing, citing four research questions anchored to Eckert & Robins (2017) text Designing Services and Programs for High-Ability Learners and Frasier’s (1991) Four A’s framework to propose general education teacher professional development as an approach to affording equal access to gifted programming and support (Eckert & Robins, 2017).

     

    Keywords: underrepresentation, gifted, minority, teacher, professional development

  • Income, Race, and Achievement Over Time: Comparing the Growth of Academically Advanced Students Using ECLS-K 1998-2007 Data

    Kathryn Brave, PhD

    Gifted Resource Teacher, Baltimore County Public Schools

    @lavinbrave

     

    The following study utilized a national database to explore the growth and placement patterns of cohorts of high-achieving students prior to the passage of ESSA (1998 to 2007).  Demographic statistics provided evidence of excellence gaps [as defined by Plucker et al. (2010), Plucker, et al. (2013), and Plucker & Peters (2016)] prior to students’ exposure to formal schooling; however, examinations across cohorts also indicated that Black and low-income students experienced less growth than their academic counterparts in reading and mathematics.  Findings also revealed that Black and low-income students were less likely to remain in the top 20% and less likely to be recommended for AP or Honors courses.  The results of this study suggest that the narrowing of excellence gaps will demand much more than measures of recruitment. Policies and procedures must also be put into place to ensure that equitable opportunities for growth and AP/Honors course placement are provided to all students, regardless of race or socioeconomic status.   

     

    Brave, K.L. (2020). Income, race, and achievement over time: Comparing the growth of academically advanced students using ECLS-K 1998-2007 data. Retrieved from https://pqdtopen.proquest.com/doc/2414442204.html?FMT=AI&pubnum=27962297

     

    Keywords: growth; race; achievement; income; excellence gaps

  • Gifted Black Girls: Factors that Influence Engagement, Achievement, & Representation in STEM Education

    Tajma Cameron, MS, MAT

    PhD Student, Drexel University

     

    Black girls represent a unique population of primary through secondary school learners that remain essentially untapped as a resource of potential STEM professionals (Young et al., 2017, p. 203). Furthermore, gifted Black girls are even more unnoticed throughout primary and secondary education.

     

    Different factors explain the disparities including a lack of engagement and encouragement during formative school years, racial and gender biases, as well as teacher perceptions of academic abilities. Essential to increasing the number of Black girls who pursue STEM majors and obtain advanced degrees in STEM, is identifying and ameliorating the factors that contribute to the disparities.

     

    Keywords: gifted black girls, STEM

  • Does Language Ability Equal Giftedness?

    Katie Coggin, EdD

    Gifted Learning Specialist, Cherry Creek School District

     

    This study examined the problem that ELLs are not identified for gifted programs at the same rate as their native English-speaking peers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among English language proficiency levels and general intellectual ability of English language learners for gifted identification. English language proficiency and general intellectual ability were defined as the performance on the ACCESS for ELLs language proficiency test and the NNAT Nonverbal Ability Test respectively. A Pearson correlation was used to examine the strength and direction of the relationship between variables. The results suggest that there is a relationship between the variable of general intellectual ability and the variables of English language proficiency, English language growth, and the domains of language. Results of this study will inform gifted educators, policy makers, and researchers around the appropriateness and effectiveness of considerations made for gifted identification.

     

    Keywords: underrepresentation, gifted identification, language proficiency, general intellectual ability, correlation

  • Elevated in Mind | Rooted in Culture: How Integrating Cultural Inclusivity and a Holistic Enrichment Program Increases GT Enrollment

    Shalelia Dillard, BA

    MA in Educational Psychology Student & Founder/Executive Director, SCD Enrichment Program

    @scdenrichment

     

    Nationally, statistics indicate that most accelerated classes are racially homogeneous, with white students making up the majority of such classes. To close the gap of students of color, specifically Black, in accelerated coursework, one must create an environment that enriches and cultivates the students color to augment success. With SCD Enrichment Program’s model and their Multicultural Nomination Scale©, there is evidence that with the combination of a critical thinking ethnic history-centered curriculum, holistic mentoring, leadership development and a culturally inclusive scale these new supports can increase enrollment of students of Color in Gifted and Talented.

     

    Keywords: Mentoring, nonprofit, students of color

  • Dismantling White Spaces in Gifted Education

    Nancy Hertzog, PhD

    Professor, Learning Sciences and Human Development, University of Washington

    @nhertzog

    Kristen Lamb, PhD

    Assistant Professor, University of Alabama

    Christine Tang, MA

    Executive Director, Families of Color Seattle

    Jana Lamon

    Director of Outreach and Enrichment Programs, Robinson Center for Young Scholars

    @jlamon32

     

    Researchers have often studied issues of access to gifted education programs using broad, generalized methods, typically focusing on methods of identification or metrics used to identify inequity (Lamb et al., 2019). Research that takes a more personalized approach to equity and access issues is limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to fill that gap by using qualitative methods to elevate the voices of families of color and understand their perceived challenges and barriers to access enriched and advanced learning opportunities.

     

    Keywords: Racism, qualitative, community partnerships, access

  • You Don't Have to be Well-Behaved to be Gifted

    Stacey Pendleton, MA

    Gifted/Talented Assessment Coordinator, Denver Public Schools

    @msstacey303

    Vanessa Ewing, PhD

    Gifted/Talented Coordinator, Denver Public Schools

    @Vanessa88946640

     

    In the spring of 2019, as part of a DPS goal to reduce suspensions, members of the Gifted and Talented Department tried to consider new ways of identifying students who may not be found through traditional pathways. We posited that many unidentified gifted students may manifest negative behaviors because their educational needs are not being acknowledged or met. We hypothesized that if students were identified and began to receive appropriate challenge, the  punitive measures for misbehaving in the classroom (e.g. fidgeting, interrupting, defying the teacher, etc.) may decrease.  After the testing was completed, 31% of the sample became eligible or potentially eligible for gifted services. In total, 9% of the sample became eligible to attend a magnet site, 1% were identified as HGT, 4% received a data point towards GT identification, and 16% were potential candidates for talent pool placement. Notably, of the students with a data point towards ID or services, 20% of those students were Black or African American and 24% were Hispanic or Latinx.  Of the students who surfaced in this micro-study, 29% had been tagged with at least one classroom defiance flag on their file.

     

    Keywords: misbehavior, under-identification, gifted services, punishment, underserved

  • Initial Descriptions, Understanding, and Design of I-REECCH

    Lindsey Reinert, EdD

    Adjunct Professor and Post-Doctoral Fellow for I-REECCH, University of Denver

    @lindsey_reinert

    Brianna McGagin, BA

    MA Student, Brown University and APA Consulting Intern

    @briaannaagraace

     

    Fayaz Amiri, MA

    I-REECCH Graduate Assistant, University of Denver

     

    Joi Lin, MS

    I-REECCH Graduate Assistant, University of Denver

    @joilinco

     

    PI: Norma Hafenstein, PhD and Co-PI: Kristina Hesbol, PhD from University of Denver

    Evaluators: Robert Reichardt, PhD and Dale DeCesare, JD from APA Consulting

     

    Impacting Rural Education through Expanding Culturally responsive curriculum, Computer science training, and Higher order thinking skills

    A U.S. Department of Education, Jacob K. Javits Grant Program Award

    https://portfolio.du.edu/IREECCH

     

    I-REECCH increases identification of and service to traditionally underrepresented gifted and talented students in rural Colorado.  The Jacob K. Javits funded project, Impacting Rural Education through Expanding Culturally responsive curriculum, Computer science training and Higher order thinking skill development, supports rural educators serving students eligible for free/reduced lunch, English language learners or who identify as Hispanic or Native American.

     

    Keywords: I-REECCH, rural, gifted identification, professional learning

  •  

    Candid Conversations about Access and Equitable Practices for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners in Gifted Education

    Lindsey Reinert, EdD

    Adjunct Professor and Post-Doctoral Fellow for I-REECCH, University of Denver

    @lindsey_reinert

    Kimberly Schmidt, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Denver

     

    In this poster session presentation, we engage participants in a visual representation of the topics: equity/ access and culturally responsive pedagogy to consider issues and best practices for the support and instruction of gifted and talented students. As the challenges of education increase, pressing issues regarding equity in the identification, support, and instruction of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) learners in gifted education prevail. In particular, the National Association for Gifted Children (2019) emphasizes, “In order to promote equitable access and school success for CLD students, schools and supportive organizations need to be strategic, purposeful, and committed to altering common identification and programming practices” (p. 1). Reversing the underrepresentation of culturally and linguistically diverse students (CLD) in gifted education will require that educators have a thorough understanding of both the reasons that CLD students have traditionally been excluded from participation in gifted programs and the pedagogical moves that will support CLD learners in the classroom. For the purposes of this poster presentation, we describe our theoretical framework, pedagogical framework, and instructional strategies.

     

    35-minute video of Candid Conversations about Access and Equitable Practices for CLD Learners in Gifted Education: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TlcgsW7FahU

     

    Keywords: culturally and linguistically diverse, gifted education, equity

  • Identifying Gifted Students: How can we better prepare teachers to address the underrepresentation of minority students?

    Samantha Tackett, PhD

    Faculty, Valdosta State University

    @stackett_AK

     

    Kelly M. Torres, PhD

    Department Chair, Educational Psychology and Technology, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

    @kelly_tcspp

     

    National data demonstrates that minority students are disproportionately referred to gifted education programs. How school districts communicate gifted education opportunities to teachers and parents can impact advocacy toward these programs. Thus, we need to prepare educators to address the underrepresentation of minority students in gifted programs. Our research included peer-reviewed sources that were published between 2018-2020. We identified a total of 41 qualifying articles that included recommendations for teacher professional education and/or intervention for minority student inclusion in gifted programs. The themes found in our study included teacher identification, cultivation of relationships, and professional development and advocacy.

     

    Keywords: Minoritized students; Culturally, Linguistically, and Economically Diverse (CLED) students; Underrepresentation; Teacher Identification; Recommendations

     

    Citation of Original Paper

    Tackett, S. & Torres, K., (2021, February). How can we help? Strategies for K-12 teachers to address the underrepresentation of minoritized gifted students. Paper presented at the 2021 annual meeting of the Eastern Educational Research Association.

     

  •  

    Building Bridges for Diverse Leaders: Reflections from a Year in Gifted & Talented Leaders of Color and Allies- GTLCA

    Carlitha Wilson, BA

    Assistant Principal of Instruction for Special Education and Gifted Services, Strive Network of Schools

    @GTleadofcolorna

    Vanessa Ewing, PhD

    Gifted/Talented Coordinator, Denver Public Schools

    @Vanessa88946640

    Maddie Velez, EdS

    Director of Students and School Counselor, Rise Up Community School

    Shalelia Dillard, BA, SCDEnrichment Founder and Executive Director

    @scdenrichment

     

    Gifted and Talented (GT) Leaders of Color and Allies started in late 2019 with a few educators of Color collaborating with advocates for the support, connection, and empowerment of Gifted Students and Educators of Color. Many reported feeling disconnected from others that shared their lived experiences as persons of Color that serve also as leaders in gifted education. We came together to create a community to support and connect with other Educators of Color (and allies) with shared experiences and expertise in working in the field of Gifted/Talented Education. Our mission is to support and connect Educators and Families of Color within the field of Gifted Education.  Through our first year in existence, we have held family events focused on advocacy and access for our underidentified and under served Latinx and Black students of Color.  Monthly meetings support our initiatives, with 5-15 members attending each session.  We have presented to educators at the Colorado Association for Gifted and Talented to discuss our initiatives and next steps in building support and collaboration for Gifted educators and students of Color.  We also partnered with Denver Public Schools Behavior Tech Team to discuss giftedness in a podcast designed to reach families across the district.  Other partnerships include SCDEnrichment, The Warrior Project, BASE Village for Gifted, and Colorado BOCES.  Through the creation of an online forum for those supporting this mission, we now have over 110 members in less than 6 months.  Upcoming initiatives, programs, and events to support Gifted and Talented Students and Leaders of Color will be shared.

     

    Keywords: under-identified, underserved, Black, LatinX, educators of Color, community building

  • Virtual Poster Session on Twitter

    Friday, February 5, 2021, 4:55 pm - 5:30 pm MT

    On Twitter, explore #2021GEPSC

    During the poster session...

    • Check out posters on this page. 
      • You can click the top right of the poster images on this page to pop out the .pdf, then zoom in to see the poster more clearly. From there, you can also download the posters and zoom in to view. 
    • If you have a Twitter account, tweet a poster presenter about their poster, ask a question, dialogue with presenters, and celebrate a finding. Use #2021GEPSC 
    • Contemplate, implement, and advocate for new ideas to Address Disproportionality in Gifted Education

This portfolio last updated: 13-Oct-2021 2:25 PM